A coarse grain model with parameter scaling of adhesion forces from liquid bridge forces and JKR theory in the discrete element method

Yoshihiro Kosaku, Yuki Tsunazawa, Chiharu Tokoro*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

The discrete element method (DEM) is a reliable tool for analyzing powder processes. However, the DEM is problematic for fine particle simulations owing to its huge computational cost. Coarse grain models, where multiple original particles are replaced with one large particle, are a promising solution. In such a model, scaling laws for forces acting on a coarse-grained particle are used to make its behaviors match the behaviors of the original particles. While various scaling laws have been proposed, there is not enough insight into combining several scaling laws and the relationship between scaled parameters. This study newly proposes a coarse grain model with a systematic parameter scaling law for adhesion forces, especially liquid bridge forces. Simulation results are compared with experimental results. Good agreements are achieved for macroscopic particle behaviors such as cascading angles and lifted heights. The adequacy of the proposed coarse grain model is also verified. The behaviors of the coarse-grained particles well match the corresponding behaviors of the original particles. Consequently, this study demonstrates the superiority of the coarse grain model by comparing its results with those obtained without the model.

Original languageEnglish
Article number118428
JournalChemical Engineering Science
Volume268
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2023 Mar 15

Keywords

  • Coarse grain model
  • Discrete element method
  • JKR theory
  • Liquid bridge force
  • Scaling law

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General Chemistry
  • General Chemical Engineering
  • Industrial and Manufacturing Engineering

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